The Structural Eurocode programme

The Structural Eurocodes are a suite of ten standards for the design of buildings and civil engineering works, as illustrated in Figure 1.1 and Plate 2 (in the book's colour section). These standards are divided into fifty-eight parts and are accompanied by National Annexes issued by the various European countries that have introduced the Eurocodes into their design practice.

EN 1991 EN 1990 ~

Standards Architecture Class
Figure 1.1. Standards within the Structural Eurocodes programme. See Plate 2 for colour version.

Outside and above the building in Figure 1.1 are ENs 1990 and 1991, key aspects of which are discussed in Chapter 2, Basis of structural design.

Eurocode - Basis of structural design (EN 1990) establishes principles and requirements for the safety, serviceability, and durability of structures; describes the basis for their design and verification; and gives guidelines for related aspects of structural reliability. This code - occasionally and mistakenly referred to as 'Eurocode 0' - explains the fundamental engineering approach that underlies the entire suite of Eurocodes.2

Eurocode 1 - Actions on structures (EN 1991) gives design guidance and actions for the structural design of buildings and civil engineering works, including some geotechnical aspects. It is divided into four parts, with Part 1 further divided into seven sub-parts.3

The pillars of the building in Figure 1.1 are the 'resistance' codes (ENs 1992 to 1996 and 1999), each of which provides detailed rules for the design of structures built in a particular material type.

Eurocode 2 - Design of concrete structures (EN 1992) covers the design of buildings and civil engineering works in plain, reinforced, and prestressed concrete. It is divided into three parts, with Part 1 further divided into two sub-parts.4

Eurocode 3 - Design of steel structures (EN 1993) covers the design of buildings and civil engineering works in steel. It is divided into six parts, with Parts 1, 3, and 4 further divided into twelve, two, and three sub-parts, respectively (for a total of twenty documents).5

Eurocode 4 - Design of composite steel and concrete structures (EN 1994) covers the design of composite structures and members for buildings and civil engineering works. It is divided into two parts, with Part 1 further divided into two sub-parts.6

Eurocode 5 - Design of timber structures (EN 1995) covers the design of buildings and civil engineering works in solid, sawn, planed, pole, or glue-laminated timber or in wood-based structural products or panels joined with adhesives or mechanical fasteners. It is divided into two parts, with Part 1 further divided into two sub-parts.7

Eurocode 6 - Design of masonry structures (EN 1996) covers the design of composite structures and members for buildings and civil engineering works. It is divided into three parts, with Part 1 further divided into two sub-parts.8

Eurocode 9 - Design of aluminium structures (EN 1999) covers the design of buildings and civil and structural engineering works in aluminium. It is published in one part which is divided into five sub-parts.9

Finally, supporting the building in Figure 1.1 are Eurocodes 7 and 8.

Eurocode 7 - Geotechnical design (EN 1997) covers geotechnical aspects of the design of buildings and civil engineering works. It is divided into two parts (with no sub-parts).10

Eurocode 8 - Design of structures for earthquake resistance (EN 1998) covers the design and construction of buildings and civil engineering works in seismic regions. It is divided into six parts (with no sub-parts). EN 1998 provides additional rules for design that supplement those given in the resistance codes for concrete, steel, and other materials.11

Thus, there are a total of 58 parts and sub-parts that constitute the ten European standards in the EN Eurocode suite.

+1 0

Post a comment