Design Of Stud Walls

In timber frame construction, the main functions of walls are to provide vertical support for floor and roof structures and strength and stability against the effects of lateral loading, generally caused by wind actions. The design of walls subjected to vertical loading and out of plane lateral actions, and where the sheathing is not designed to function compositely with the wall studs, is addressed in this chapter. The strength of stud walling in which the sheathing and the studs are designed...

Structural Timber Design Examples

As stated in 4.3, in order to verify the ultimate and serviceability limit states, each design effect has to be checked and for each effect the largest value caused by the relevant combination of actions must be used. However, to ensure attention is primarily focussed on the EC5 design rules for the timber or wood product being used, only the design load case producing the largest design effect has generally been given or evaluated in the following examples. Example 11.12.1 A timber-to-timber...

Info

Characteristic values 14, 21-38, 58, 153, 207, 209 characteristic values of actions 58 accidental actions 58 permanent actions 58 variable actions 58 characteristic yield moment 88, 383 classification of actions 58 clear span 104 columns, see Chapters 5, 6, and 8 axial compression 69, 148, 150, 163, 299 axial tension 162, 168 built-up 148, 292-337 buckling strength 152-154, 294, 300 characteristic compressive strength 152, 155, 254, 265, 301, 302 combined bending and axial compression, 164-166,...

Terms and definitions EC

Some of the terms and definitions used in EC0 are slightly different to those normally used in UK timber design practice and the following, including some terms for those not familiar with limit states design, are to be noted Action. This is the term used for a load or force applied to the structure (i.e. a direct action). This term is also used for imposed displacements, e.g. settlement (i.e. an indirect action). Effect of action. This is the term used for the internal stress resultants or...

Axial Loading Of Metal Dowel Connection Systems

Perpendicular Grain

The strength equations given in the following sub-sections assume that the tensile strength of fasteners will always exceed their withdrawal capacity from the connection. If, however, there is a need to evaluate the tensile strength of the fastener, it should be carried out in accordance with the requirements of EN 1993-1-1. The withdrawal capacity of nails loaded axially is dependent on the type of nail being used. Smooth round wire nails give the poorest result and with threaded nails the...

Timber Tension Member Design

As stated in 4.3, in order to verify the ultimate and serviceability limit states, each design effect has to be checked and for each effect the largest value caused by the relevant combination of actions must be used. However, to ensure attention is primarily focussed on the EC5 design rules for the timber or wood product being used, only the design load case producing the largest design effect has generally been given or evaluated in the following examples. Example 10.13.1 A timber-to-timber...

The Inplane Racking Resistance Of Timber Walls Under Horizontal And Vertical Loading

The stud walls associated with timber-framed buildings are usually sheathed on one or both faces with the sheathing securely fixed to the studs, enabling the wall to act as a rigid diaphragm. The fixings e.g. nails provide the bulk of the racking resistance through timber bearing and nail deformation when the lateral external force is applied as shown in Figure 9.8b. Horizontal sliding of the wall is resisted by anchorages such as nails or bolts along the sole plate sufficient to resist the...