Vertical Effects Of Nosing

A 0,5 x (LM71+SW 0) instead of (LM71+SW 0) where vertical traffic actions favourable. b Valid for heavy freight traffic limited to a maximum speed of 120 km h. c a 1 to avoid double counting the reduction in mass of train with f d See 6.5.1(3) regarding vertical effects of centrifugal loading. Vertical load effect of centrifugal loading less any reduction due to cant should be enhanced by the relevant dynamic factor. When determining the vertical effect of centrifugal force, factor f to be...

Rail Load Model 71 Equivalent Vertical Loading For Earthworks

Figure 6.1 - Load Model 71 and characteristic values for vertical loads (3)P The characteristic values given in Figure 6.1 shall be multiplied by a factor a, on lines carrying rail traffic which is heavier or lighter than normal rail traffic. When multiplied by the factor a the loads are called classified vertical loads. This factor a shall be one of the following 0,75 - 0,83 - 0,91 - 1,00 - 1,10 - 1,21 - 1,33 - 1.46 The actions listed below shall be multiplied by the same factor - equivalent...

Info

6.6.5 Multiple-surface structures alongside the track with vertical and horizontal or inclined surfaces (e.g. bent noise barriers, platform canopies with vertical walls etc.) (1) The characteristic values of the actions, q4k, as given in Figure 6.25 should be applied normal to the surfaces considered. The actions should be taken from the graphs in Figure 6.22 adopting a track distance the lesser of where distances min ag and max ag are shown in Figure 6.25. (2) If max ag > 6 m the value max...

Traffic Loads On Bridges

Compound Microscope Ray Diagram Easy

(2) For any combination of traffic loads together with actions specified in other Parts of EN 1991, any such group should be considered as one action. NOTE For the individual components of the traffic loads on footbridges, the other representative values are defined in EN 1990, A2. 5.6 Actions for accidental design situations for footbridges - road traffic under the bridge (i.e. collision) or - the accidental presence of a heavy vehicle on the bridge. NOTE Other collision forces (see 2.3) may...

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Arema Centrifugal Force Bridges

Maximum permissible expansion length Influence length of the loaded part of curved track determinant length (length associated with ( ) Longitudinal forces acting along the centreline of the track Longitudinal forces acting along the centreline of the track M Number of point forces in a train N Number of regularly repeating coaches or vehicles, or number of axles, or number of equal point forces P Point force Individual axle load Q Concentrated force or variable action (general) QAid Point load...

Load Model1 Notional Width

W Carriageway width W Notional lane width Figure 4.1 - Example of the Lane Numbering in the most general case (5) Where the carriageway consists of two separate parts on the same deck, only one numbering should be used for the whole carriageway. NOTE Hence, even if the carriageway is divided into two separate parts, there is only one Lane Number 1, which can be alternatively on the two parts. (6) Where the carriageway consists of two separate parts on two independent decks, each part should be...

Section Actions on footways cycle tracks and footbridges

1 Load models defined in this section are applicable to footways, cycle tracks and footbridges. 2 The uniformly distributed load qfk defined in 5.3.2.1 and the concentrated load Qwk defined in 5.3.2.2 should be used for road and railway bridges as well as for footbridges, where relevant see 4.5, 4.7.3 and 6.3.6.2 1 . All other variable actions and actions for accidental design situations defined in this section are intended only for footbridges. NOTE 1 For loads on access steps, see 6.3 in EN...

Dispersal Of Load Through Backfill Curocode

The horizontal force, acting transversely, may be applied 100 mm below the top of the selected vehicle restraint system or 1,0 m above the level of the carriageway or footway, whichever is the lower, and on a line 0,5 m long. NOTE 2 The values of the horizontal forces given for the classes A to D derive from measurements during collision tests on real vehicle restraint systems used for bridges. There is no direct correlation between these values and performance classes of vehicle restraint...